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Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Life On Mars?

A Fortune Teller at a Stansfield View Hospital  Gala ,Todmorden:197?
Older Benchers may remember This Post and this one about Stansfield View Hospital where I worked aged 16-18.Atop of the Pennine Moors above Todmorden near Stoodley Pike
.An old isolated Victorian workhouse that was converted into a Mental Hospital.
Pretty grim.Now demolished. This week I came into possession of a 2 hour DVD of old 8mm film shot there  in  the 1960s&70's.The first 20 minutes i include here (more to follow) Who knows,I may find myself if I look hard enough.They say The Past Is Another Country.......More Like Another Fucking Planet! This video perhaps illustrates the need to mark out a community territory.A shared order....however fleeting.....beating a boundary . You know,
Reading this wikipedia page ,it seems that the origin of the term/concept of "Gangs" derives from this English tradition of "Beating The Bounds"
Once Upon A Time..........The gentle author  remembers sitting in the sauna box at Todmorden Pool.I was talking to a lady who seemed to know a lot about the history of The Spiritualist Church in England between the Wars.Attendances   were up (lots of bereaved widows I guess). During a packed service, they would sometimes get young children to walk up and down the aisles throughout the prayers.It was thought this helped encourage the Spirits of the dead to appear...............
 "The custom of 'Beating the Bounds' has taken place in a variety of forms in Britain for over 2000 years. Its origins have roots in many different cultures from across Europe and beyond. In essence it involves local inhabitants perambulating their farm, manorial, church or civic boundaries, pausing as they pass certain trees, walls and hedges that denote the extent of the boundary to exclaim, pray and ritually 'beat' particular landmarks (or even young boys) with sticks. The ceremony might also involve the blessing of crops or animals and the inspection of fences....{Read More}
Beating the Bounds:Oldham:1951

Below,one of my Father-in-Laws photos from 1950s Halifax.To see more,click here
This is a Sepia Saturday post.
Jumpers For Goalposts:Halifax:195?
She told me she knew some lads who were into playing football," he said. They turned out to be a group organised by word of mouth by former Poland striker Jozef Ciszewski, who died in 1987 aged 83. "He wanted to give the games a formal character, and by the spring of 1940, the idea of a championship for occupied Warsaw was born," said Rylski. On May 20, 1940, eight teams from different parts of Warsaw met on Mokotowskie Fields, a park south of the city centre. "The conditions were pretty primitive. We used coats for goalposts," said Rylski, who alternated as a striker, midfielder or defender. His side, Blysk, won that round-robin competition, which spawned a full-fledged Warsaw District Football Association whose teams also drew pre-war professionals. "We'd play in different places around the city, to avoid the German security service catching on. We had huge personal satisfaction and a sense of freedom." "But we also felt pressure, because you knew you could be arrested at any time." Lookouts were posted to warn of the arrival of German patrols. "We had to scatter if we saw armoured cars, and declare an abandoned match," he said. In 1943, Blysk was wound up. "Most of the players had been arrested, deported or killed," said Rylski, whose secret football career was combined with training to be a resistance lieutenant. He joined a new-born club, Marymont, playing there until the Home Army's ill-fated 1944 Warsaw Uprising, during which the Nazis destroyed the city before retreating as the Soviets advanced. Returning to the club to play from 1945 to 1948, he then moved into management. He went on to become an official in the Polish Football Association, and was a member of the UEFA executive committee that launched the first European championship in 1960. {Football:The Warsaw Uprising}
George Hinchliffe of The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain is a personal friend of Ken who I went to Burnley with today.This a great song and is an integral part of what I am trying to say, in my cack-handed way, in this post..............

21 comments:

Kristin said...

Interesting both the beating and the Warsaw football. A friend just wrote me last week about the Warsaw uprising.

Brian Miller said...

that is really cool...i like the beating of the bounds...and interesting look at a cultural activity...also very interesting as well on the football...'Most of the players had been arrested, deported or killed'...wow...cool pics too tony

Karen S. said...

The beating of the bounds is awesome, love their expressions. I know of that church as well, and actually went to a small town in New York state where they are still very active, it was quite a fascinating trip. Harry Houdini used to go there often after his mother died. I always love your photos of the in-laws! Cool, and this video is very lovely, I'll have to look her up for more...very interesting post Tony, thanks.

tony said...

I didn't know that about Harry.Somewhere else he went once was Halifax West Yorkshire .He managed to Escape Halifax! No Mean Feat....!

tony said...

Oh! How Did Harry Houdini Walk Through A Brick Wall?

Kurt said...

I so want to learn! But I didn't understand that wikipedia article.

Martin said...

Really enjoyable post, Tony. We never quite know what we're going to get, but it's always a good read.

Akelamalu said...

Interesting post Tony, thanks.

Peter said...

I learned a lot, reading your post! The first picture is magnificent.
Thanks.

Little Nell said...

A very interesting post, with some nice pics (the father-in-law). A lovely eclectic mix of music too. I really enjoyed the Fairport Convention version of She Moved Through the Fair, one of my favourite ballads. I have many versions, including Sinead O Connor and Art Garfunkel, but it's good to be reminded of the purity of Sandy Denny's vocals.

Postcardy said...

I never heard of beating the bounds. I do remember sack races when I was young.

barbara and nancy said...

I loved the ukelele orchestra. How unusual. Actually a friend of mine is in a ukelele group but I doubt if they're as accomplished as the Great Britain version.

Queen Bee said...

Lovely rendition of Life on Mars. The song reminded me of the BBC show with the same name. Did you ever see it? I've only seen the American version.

Dominic Rivron said...

I think I've said before, but my work used to take me up to the View now and again.

I just remeber the days of trilby hats and macs/overcoats. These days it's be a mix of hoodies, lycra and walking poles.

Perhaps, given revent events here, we should take beating the bounds more seriously. Unfortunately the bounds here run over a military firing range.

Teresa Wilson Rogers said...

I never heard of beating of the bounds and its been around for 2000 years you say? Wow! We had sack races when I was kid, I wasn't very good at and hated participating. I'm more of a "sit on the sidelines and cheer" type of girl.

Bob Scotney said...

They ride the bounds at Yarm every October when the fair comes to town.

I am in the process of trying to make sense of memories written by a survivor of the Warsaw Uprising and a German concentration camp. Unfortunately he has skipped over much of the detail and concentrated on emigration to the USA via Australia.

TICKLEBEAR said...

Dreadful conditions to play a simple game. Poland sure has come a long way since those days...

And from that article you linked, I've learned there is a roman god called Terminus. Who knew?!?
:D~
HUGZ

imagespast said...

Another interesting and informative post, Tony, and I love the photo of the little boy sitting on the football. His mate just wants to get on with the game, I suspect :-) Jo

blackwatertown said...

Interesting stories and pics Tony - as usual.
Meanwhile - You’ve just been nominated for two blog awards. I know – very exciting. Be still your racing heart! To accept them you have to follow some rules – list seven things, recommend some other bloggers, yadda yadda – details are here http://tinyurl.com/9yls7nc
The awards are – the Versatile Blogger Award and the One Lovely Blog Award.
I suppose it’s mainly an excuse for me to point other people towards you.
Ta ra.

tony said...

*BLUSHES* Thanks.:)

FrankandMary said...

I've gotta comment on the EYE chick, she is very much freaking me out ;o. ~Mary