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Thursday, August 01, 2013

who is Elegbara?

press play to hear my post
Robert Johnson & Johnny Shines

"In Africa, almost every cultural group has its own version of the crossroads god. Legba, Ellegua, Elegbara, Eshu, Exu, Nbumba Nzila, and Pomba Gira are African and African-diaspora names (in several languages) for the spirit who opens the way, guards the crossroads, and teaches wisdom. ........" [read more about Crossroad Lore Worldwide]
This is a Sepia Saturday post.OK this week's post is about blokes in hats (& indirectly boats).
My photos& Videos from John Billingsley walk in Heptonstall here
"As trickster, Eshu is associated with disorder and destiny in the Yoruba pantheon. As "orisa orita" or "esu orita", orisha of the crossroad or the corners, Elegba represents the transitional or center point of the crossroad where one must make a decision. In this position, Elegba represents all the bewilderment and confusion one faces when attempting to make the proper choice. Once the choice is made, he is involved in the consequences and through his own devices guides us towards and along our proper path....." Who Is Elegba?

a photo i took in 2009 on The Albert Dock in Liverpool.

REFERENCES:

19 comments:

Brian Miller said...

interesting...i would probably want to sit and listen to those conversations...i imagine them quite interesting...and hey finding the answer is cool too...ha

Karen S. said...

I totally enjoyed hearing you (between one of my dog's barking!) he couldn't really understand where your voice was coming from. How interesting too that you spoke with a woman from Minnesota about cotton. I also like your background laughter popping in too! Awesome photos, post listening to your script....!

Ann ODyne said...

The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind.
If you had a question that needed answering ...
"what's that noise Kath?"
Midnight In Hepton Bridge does not "sound a bit creepy" it sounds like a very groovy song.
and yes indeed "the wealth had blood on it" as most wealth does.

That million-dollar image of HRH Robert Johnson looks too slick to be real it shows some fine detail, but not the fine detail of strings on his ax, man. The hat is worth a week's wages, and he has a pinky ring. Business was clearly good.

oh when those cotton balls get rotten, You don't pick very much cotton. Tom & Dusty Springfield.
Tammy Wynette picked cotton before singing, and let us spare a thought for the bad lungs of all the factory children earning the fortunes that built huge mansions and supported London jewellers.

*Oh I woke up this mornin' felt like reading blogs.
Woke up this morning, thought I'd read some blogs.
When I turned my laptop on,
World had gone to the dogs.*

Alan Burnett said...

Now that's what I call a choice - to Halifax and the cradle of civilisation or to Colne and the witches of Pendle. If ever you need a cross roads God, you need one in Hebden Bridge.

tony said...

Yea,I'm not really sure if that photo is "real"...Too Good To Be True? hereis some info on it's finding....

Brett Payne said...

I like the signpost.

Jackie said...

Hello
This is my first time on sepia Saturday so I apologise if I get this all wrong but I thought I would try this week. The photo of the sign post is lovely ... What a piece of art the sign post in itself is love the pointing hands
Jackie
http://scrapbangwallop.blogspot.com

Little Nell said...

Nice to hear that you are able to educate people about the cotton industry's history. I add my voice to the others who admire that signpost too.

Sharon said...

I am with Brett. Love the sign post.

barbara and nancy said...

Being an American, I'm glad to hear that your group were not totally oblivious. Maybe just the Minnesota lady.
Nancy
p.s. it was fun hearing your blog.

Joan said...

tony, this is the 3rd attempt at commenting on your post for this week. 1st, really enjoyed hearing your voice, syntax, and the laughter in the background. 2nd, Midnight on a bench near Heptonstall Bridge sounds quite nice to me in a spooky kind of way. 3rd,your description of your tours through Heptonstall prompted me to engage in a bit of Googling. Thanks.

Kristin said...

Great picture of Robert Johnson & Johnny Shines. Let us know what answers you get to your questions sitting around at the crossroads of Hepdonstal.

Wendy said...

Crossroads god - a new concept for me. I remember learning about Greek and Roman gods, and a bit about Norse, but never was a god of the crossroads included.

Bob Scotney said...

Midnight anywhere sounds creepy to me these days. It's good to see an old sign like that in such good state. I didn't like the look of the shackles in your photo.

Mike Brubaker said...

A great mixed media and thoughtful essay. As a reader of histories, it bothers me to find descriptions of global or regional economy that ignore slavery or other human suffering that cheaply harvested or processed the raw materials. The early rubber and fertilizer industries like the cotton mills were built on horrific exploitation of native people.

Akelamalu said...

That signpost is cool!

Deb Gould said...

Hearing your voice, Tony, is next to magic after all this time! Loved the photos -- even the gruesome manacles and all they represent. Wonderful post!

A Cuban In London said...

I'm so pleased to read your post and hear the audio.

I'm a fully qualified Afro-Cuban teacher who performed for three years with the Havana University Folkloric Ensemble. One of my signature performances with the company was the Eleggua dance (you call it Elegbara in your post. We also spell it the same way). He opens and closes the roads. In my house in Havana my late auntie used to have sessions led by a "babalawo" (priest) of the Yoruba religion. Although I am an atheist, my family involved me in the ceremonies, too. I was too young to refuse, but the whole process gave me a powerful insight into the myths and traditions of African cultures in Cuba

Thanks for such a good post.

Greetings from London.

tony said...

A fascinating comment. Eleggua Lives! I have only been to Cuba/Habana once (1997) & i came across several insights how Culture Lives On Despite It All......I hope Eleggua opens up my road to Cuba again..Real Soon! Thanx from Tony